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NICKEL (the metal): Allergen or Not An Allergen?

NICKEL (the metal): Allergen or Not An Allergen?

Allergen
Not An Allergen
Not just an allergen or a top allergen nickel is frequently the number one most common allergen on published allergen lists.

LEMON, LIME: Allergen or Not An Allergen?

LEMON, LIME: Allergen or Not An Allergen?

Allergen
Not An Allergen
They are common allergens but — being so packed with wonderful vitamins and antioxidants— lemon, lime and other citruses should not be avoided, particularly as foods, unless you are truly allergic to them.
GLASS: Allergen or Not An Allergen?

GLASS: Allergen or Not An Allergen?

Allergen
Not An Allergen
Glass is inert, very chemically stable, and does not react with other substances or absorb them.
LAVENDER: Allergen or Not An Allergen?

LAVENDER: Allergen or Not An Allergen?

Allergen
Not An Allergen
A beautiful, gorgeous-smelling, and soothing herb used for centuries, lavender is on published common allergen lists.
“SULFATES”: Allergen or Not An Allergen?

“SULFATES”: Allergen or Not An Allergen?

Allergen
Not An Allergen
“Sulfates” is a pretty broad term that has gotten a lot of bad press. While some of these bubble-producers are proven irritants, they are not on published allergen lists.
COCONUT JAM: Allergen or Not An Allergen?

COCONUT JAM: Allergen or Not An Allergen?

Allergen
Not An Allergen
The relatively healthier spread coconut jam is not a published common allergen. To make sure you lower the risk of a skin reaction around the mouth or elsewhere, choose pure coconut jam with only coconut sugar and coconut oil or coconut milk as the ingredients.
BAKING SODA: Allergen or Not An Allergen?

BAKING SODA: Allergen or Not An Allergen?

Allergen
Not An Allergen
Baking soda is another classic favorite of many dermatologists for its versatility and non-allergenicity. 
ELASTICS IN UNDERWEAR/SOCKS/CLOTHING: Allergen or Not An Allergen?

ELASTICS IN UNDERWEAR/SOCKS/CLOTHING: Allergen or Not An Allergen?

Allergen
Not An Allergen
Clothing contact dermatitis can occur due to several allergens, including dyes and mordants (chemicals related to metals that are present in some fabrics to help colorants bind better)
and elastics.

CORTICOSTEROIDS: Allergen or Not An Allergen?

CORTICOSTEROIDS: Allergen or Not An Allergen?

Allergen
Not An Allergen
In what is a particularly cruel irony, many of the steroids used to calm extreme itching and inflammation may cause them. Corticosteroids were the American Contact Dermatitis Society‘s “allergen of the year” in 2005.
CITRIC ACID: Allergen or Not An Allergen?

CITRIC ACID: Allergen or Not An Allergen?

Allergen
Not An Allergen
Citric acid is so popular in cosmetics partly because it is widely considered to be stable and non-allergenic — it is not on published lists of common allergens. Also, contact dermatitis literature (at the time of this writing) shows no documented cases of allergy to citric acid.
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