Categories
Allergen, Not An Allergen Featured

COCONUT WATER: Allergen or Not An Allergen?

Not An Allergen

Coconut Water

It’s not (yet) commonly used on skin but it could be: coconut water is very hydrating, moisturizing, a great source of vitamin C, is non-comedogenic, and is not a top contact allergen. It also has growth hormones and cytokines which have been shown to promote cell growth. Like most coconut derivatives, it also has some anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial properties. And it has antioxidants!

Drinking it has several benefits, too. It’s rich in antioxidants, vitamins, nutrients, iron, and potassium, which is why it’s a favorite alternative to sports drinks — which also tend to have dyes, flavors (related to fragrances), and preservatives as contact allergens, plus lots more sugar). Don’t overdo it, however: too much potassium (hyperkalemia) is very dangerous.

To be clear, we’re referring to pure coconut water, i.e. directly from the fresh coconut or the ingredients list on the package shows that one ingredient. Other coconut waters might contain preservatives or flavors to watch out for.

If you have a history of sensitive skin, don’t guess: random trial and error can cause more damage. Ask your dermatologist about a patch test.

To shop our selection of hypoallergenic products, visit vmvhypoallergenics.com. Need help? Ask us in the comments section below, or for more privacy (such as when asking us to customize recommendations for you based on your patch test results) contact us by email, or drop us a private message on Facebook.

For more:

On the prevalence of skin allergies, see Skin Allergies Are More Common Than Ever and One In Four Is Allergic to Common Skin Care And Cosmetic Ingredients.

To learn more about the VH-Rating System and hypoallergenicity, click here.

Main References: 

Regularly published reports on the most common allergens by the North American Contact Dermatitis Group and European Surveillance System on Contact Allergies (based on over 28,000 patch test results, combined), plus other studies. Remember, we are all individuals — just because an ingredient is not on the most common allergen lists does not mean you cannot be sensitive to it, or that it will not become an allergen. These references, being based on so many patch test results, are a good basis but it is always best to get a patch test yourself.

1. Warshaw, E.M., Maibach, H.I., Taylor, J.S., et al. North American contact dermatitis group patch test results: 2011-2012. Dermatitis. 2015; 26: 49-59.

2. W Uter et al. The European Baseline Series in 10 European Countries, 2005/2006–Results of the European Surveillance System on Contact Allergies (ESSCA). Contact Dermatitis 61 (1), 31-38.7 2009.

3. Wetter, DA et al. Results of patch testing to personal care product allergens in a standard series and a supplemental cosmetic series: An analysis of 945 patients from the Mayo Clinic Contact Dermatitis Group, 2000-2007. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2010 Nov;63(5):789-98.

4. Verallo-Rowell VM. The validated hypoallergenic cosmetics rating system: its 30-year evolution and effect on the prevalence of cosmetic reactions. Dermatitis 2011 Apr; 22(2):80-97.

5. Ruby Pawankar et al. World Health Organization. White Book on Allergy 2011-2012 Executive Summary.

6. Misery L et al. Sensitive skin in the American population: prevalence, clinical data, and role of the dermatologist. Int J Dermatol. 2011 Aug;50(8):961-7.

7. Warshaw EM1, Maibach HI, Taylor JS, Sasseville D, DeKoven JG, Zirwas MJ, Fransway AF, Mathias CG, Zug KA, DeLeo VA, Fowler JF Jr, Marks JG, Pratt MD, Storrs FJ, Belsito DV. North American contact dermatitis group patch test results: 2011-2012.Dermatitis. 2015 Jan-Feb;26(1):49-59.

8. Warshaw, E et al. Allergic patch test reactions associated with cosmetics: Retrospective analysis of cross-sectional data from the North American Contact Dermatitis Group, 2001-2004. J AmAcadDermatol 2009;60:23-38. 

9. Foliaki S et al. Antibiotic use in infancy and symptoms of asthma, rhinoconjunctivitis, and eczema in children 6 and 7 years old: International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood Phase III. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2009 Nov;124(5):982-9.

10. Kei EF et al. Role of the gut microbiota in defining human health. Expert Rev Anti Infect Ther. 2010 Apr; 8(4): 435–454.

11. Thavagnanam S et al. A meta-analysis of the association between Caesarean section and childhood asthma. Clin Exp Allergy. 2008;38(4):629–633.

12. Marks JG, Belsito DV, DeLeo VA, et al. North American Contact Dermatitis Group patch-test results, 1998 to 2000. Am J Contact Dermat. 2003;14(2):59-62.

13. Warshaw EM, Belsito DV, Taylor JS, et al. North American Contact Dermatitis Group patch test results: 2009 to 2010. Dermatitis. 2013;24(2):50-99.

Want more great information on contact dermatitis? Check out the American Contact Dermatitis SocietyDermnet New Zealand, and your country’s contact dermatitis association.


Laura is our “dew”-good CEO at VMV Hypoallergenics and eldest daughter of VMV’s founding dermatologist-dermatopathologist. She has two children, Madison and Gavin, and works at VMV with her sister CC and husband Juan Pablo (Madison and Gavin frequently volunteer their “usage testing” services). In addition to saving the world’s skin, Laura is passionate about health, inclusion, cultural theory, human rights, happiness, and spreading goodness (like a great cream!)

Categories
Healthy Living

Is Oil Pulling Legit? 5 Things I Learned About This Health Fad

From celebrities to health gurus and beauty insiders, oil pulling’s gotten some serious attention. Is it legit?

My mom’s been doing it for years but is the oil-pulling health fad pulling our legs more than anything else? I decided to learn more.

“Ick, ick, ick, gag, ick, gag.” This is what my poor mother — the big brain behind VMV Hypoallergenics’ phenomenal science — hears from me when she tells me to try oil pulling, which she does regularly. I have PFAPA (Periodic Fever, Aphthous stomatitis, Pharyngitis and Adenitis) which, at its simplest, means I have an over-zealous inflammatory response and get sick several times a year at regular intervals. When I have a flare-up, to help with the aphthous lesions (canker sores), painful throat, and inflamed adenoids (and eventual sinusitis), she hands me some virgin coconut oil with the one-word instruction: gargle.

I don’t need convincing that virgin coconut oil (VCO) is good for you. There is a solid and growing body of science on this incredible substance’s multiple benefits for skin, mind, and body. My mother herself has authored many of the randomized, double-blind studies published on VCO that are in peer-reviewed medical journals, and she is considered an authority on it. I use the stuff on my skin, it’s in almost every VMV product. My family and I eat it daily in salads and more (we cook with it, too). But swishing and gargling with it? Ick. And gag.

After another flare-up I thought: ok, woman, oil pulling’s quite the fad and your mom’s never wrong about these things…find out more. So I did. These are the 5 most compelling things that I learned in my personal “skinvestigation.”

01 : SWISHING IS ON PURPOSE

Eating virgin coconut oil is great for your heart and cells. Coconut oil is so good for you that even less-pure, non-hypoallergenic RBD oil that we wouldn’t recommend for skin is better for cooking than other oils. Applying VCO on the skin is excellent for cellular strength, barrier repair, moisturization and disinfection. But why swish it around in the mouth? The logic of oil-pulling goes: if VCO is so good when eaten and applied topically, its absorption through the mouth could be a faster, more efficient way of getting the benefits of VCO.

Because the mouth’s mucosal interior is full of blood vessels, many drugs are made specifically to be absorbed in the mouth (a common one is sublingual melatonin). Mouth absorption can act faster and bypass the digestive tract, entering the body’s systemic circulation directly and delivering health benefits that would otherwise be lost to gastrointestinal and metabolic processing.

In other words, eating VCO and applying it on skin and hair are awesome ways to get its benefits, but you can get even more by its being absorbed through the mouth lining.

*Zhang H1, Zhang J, Streisand JB. Oral mucosal drug delivery: clinical pharmacokinetics and therapeutic applications. Clin Pharmacokinet. 2002;41(9):661-80.

02 : TEETH, GUMS, BREATH

With its proven antimicrobial action, VCO swilling may be able to fend off cavities (which are bacterial infections). As an anti-inflammatory, it prevents gum disease and soreness. Anecdotally, my mother can’t remember the last time she had a cavity or gum problem. At her last dental visit for preventive maintenance, the dentist pulled staff from his full clinic to see this septuagenarian’s amazing teeth.

Bad breath? Oil pulling could help by minimizing halitosis-causing bacteria.

What about whitening teeth? It seems possible. Bacteria is a cause of enamel erosion which is what leads to dentin’s natural yellow color showing through.

03 : CAN IT HELP SKIN?

Indirectly, by controlling bacteria, oil pulling could potentially reduce your need for fluoridated mouthwashes and let you switch to a fluoride-free toothpaste like Essence Skin-Saving Toothpaste…and we know that doing so can dramatically clear up acne around the mouth, and on the chin and jaw line (fluorides can be acnegenic.)

More directly, if you have a compromised immune system (as some who are undergoing cancer therapy do), or sores from PFAPA, Behçet’s, herpes or another condition, or if you have Sjogren’s disease (which makes the skin and mucosal surfaces dry), VCO pulling can help soothe the pain, and help clear the lesions faster.

04 : WHY VIRGIN COCONUT OIL?

The mouth is both very sensitive and a hotbed of microbes. It seems like if oil pulling is beneficial it’s largely due to the antibacterial action — in which case, VCO’s proven broad-spectrum anti-microbial effects (on bacteria, fungi and viruses) makes it the ideal choice.

Other pluses are VCO’s stable saturated medium-chain triglycerides (vital to cell repair) and its anti-inflammatory effects (important for sores and infection). It is hypoallergenic (not an allergen) and non-comedogenic, too.

Choose an organic, hypoallergenic, first-cold pressed oil like Know-It-Oil (the actual oil my mom uses in her clinical studies) so that you keep as much of the phytochemical content (the good stuff) as possible. Avoid dyes, flavors and allergenic chemicals sometimes used in extraction and processing, particularly in RBD (refined, bleached, deodorized coconut oil).

05 : GAG ME WITH A SPOON?

Not anymore! First, I learned that you don’t have to actively swish the oil in the mouth, which can get exhausting. Just keeping your mouth closed and letting the oil sit there works. Second, I use this trick with my kids in waiting rooms and on myself when I’m crazy lazy to work out: distraction.

Oil pulling to a TV show can distract me for the recommended 20 minutes — especially when I’m binge-watching. Another trick I do regularly is put the bottle of VCO in the shower with me so it melts in the hot water and I can already pour some in my mouth…by the time I’m done bathing, doing my skincare regimen, and changing, I’m close to the 20 minutes anyway. And, I’ve also used it to help me be good about meditation: pour, sit, breathe, set a 20-minute timer.

With the new research on probiotics and my PFAPA, I’m swilling daily now, with VCO and a coconut-derived vinegar from the same farm that grows our organic coconut oil. I don’t have the studies to prove it yet, but this daily gargling plus my major increase in fermented foods (if it’s pickled, I’ll eat it) seems to correlated to a dramatic decrease in my mouth lesions and sinus infections.

My conclusion? Clinical studies specifically on oil pulling still need to be done, but the benefits seem bountiful and the downsides nil. So oil in mouth, grab the remote or a good book, and chill while you swill.


lvb-6x10df_bertotto8213sm-20161128

Laura is the CEO of VMV Hypoallergenics and eldest daughter of our founding dermatologist-dermatopathologist. She has two children, Madison and Gavin, and works at VMV with her sister and husband (Madison and Gavin frequently volunteer their “usage testing” services). In addition to saving the world’s skin, Laura is passionate about learning, literature, art, health, science, inclusion, cultural theory, human rights, happiness and goodness.

Categories
Family Blog Featured Healthy Living

Spiced Coconut Cups

Happy-Happy-Joy-Joy in a Bowl

Thanks to all my mom’s research into this drupe, we’re loco for coconuts. Almost every part of the coconut is tremendously healthy. Virgin coconut oil’s fatty acids are native to skin, it’s excellent at helping to repair the skin’s barrier layer and for replacing lost lipids — making it an unrivaled moisturizer. It’s rich in anti-inflammatories, heart healthy and cholesterol-free. Its excellent as a sport drink (with none of the dyes or preservatives of many typical energy drinks) and more potassium than bananas. At VMV HYPOALLERGENICS, we use my mother’s clinically-published virgin coconut oil in almost all our products — and we use it in cooking, too! This recipe for Spiced Coconut Cups was created by Luis Terry, one of our dearest friends and one of VMV’s most popular (scrumptious) faces :). He’s also an executive chef and culinary R&D consultant, sought after for his insanely delicious and highly imaginative Spanish-Middle Eastern-Southeast Asian cuisine. This dessert is comfort, warmth and fun. Creamy custard is traditional enough to be comfort food…but add the unexpected cheer of coconut and cheek of spices, and it’s happy-happy-joy-joy in a bowl.

 Laura

WHAT YOU’LL NEED: Serves 8

  • 1 3-inch piece of cassia bark or 2 cinnamon sticks 1 tsp. ground nutmeg
  • 120 g. muscovado (raw brown sugar) or brown sugar; my family uses coconut sugar instead
  • 1/3 cup + 1 tbsp. (100 ml.) water
  • 4 eggs
  • 2 tsp. whole cloves
  • 2 tbs. Know-It-Oil virgin coconut oil
  • 10 oz. (300ml) half-and-half 13.5 oz. (400 ml.) coconut milk 2 egg yolks

HOW:

Combine spices, half-and-half and water in a medium pan. Bring to a light simmer then reduce heat to a minimum for approximately 5 minutes allowing the spices to infuse their flavors. Add coconut milk and sugar to the pan and heat until sugar is fully dissolved. Set aside to cool.

Whisk whole eggs, yolks and Know-It-Oil until smooth and pour slowly, but in a steady stream, into the cooled milk mixture. Once combined, strain custard through a fine sieve into a pitcher and discard spices.

Preheat oven to 325. Pour the custard mixture into 8 individual ramekins and place them in a deep baking dish filled with boiling water. Make sure the water level reaches 3⁄4 up the sides. Bake for 40-45 minutes.

Poke the center of one of the custards with a toothpick or a knife to check if it has set. The custards should only be slightly wobbly in the middle. Serve hot or very chilled, with a dab of clotted cream or kaymak and a sprinkle of toasted grated coconut.

 

#skinsideouthealth

 

Categories
Allergen, Not An Allergen Featured Skin

LILY: Allergen or Not An Allergen?

Allergen.

Lily (Alstroemeria)

So many flowers and plants are top allergens (browse through our Allergen-Not An Allergen tab), and this beautiful bloom is no exception. Allergic contact dermatitis to Alstroemeria (or tuliposide A, the allergen in this flower) can be common in gardeners, florists, and gardening hobbyists, showing as thick, cracking, red, tender skin on fingers where they most come into contact with the flower. Gloves can help if they are made out of nitrile, as tuliposide A is known to penetrate through vinyl gloves. There have been some recent reports of reactions to nitrile, however, and while more studies are needed, some possible culprits could be latex contamination from where the nitrile gloves are manufactured, or rubber accelerators like thiuram. Note that airborne contact dermatitis has also been reported, so if you have patch tested positive for tuliposide A, look out for redness and other signs of irritation under the nose, or even hyperpigmentation on the arms or face.

If you have a history of sensitive skin, don’t guess: random trial and error can cause more damage. Ask your dermatologist about a patch test.

For more:

On the prevalence of skin allergies, see Skin Allergies Are More Common Than Ever and One In Four Is Allergic to Common Skin Care And Cosmetic Ingredients.

To learn more about the VH-Rating System and hypoallergenicity, click here.

References: 

Regularly published reports on the most common allergens by the North American Contact Dermatitis Group and European Surveillance System on Contact Allergies (based on over 28,000 patch test results, combined), plus other studies. Remember, we are all individuals — just because an ingredient is not on the most common allergen lists does not mean you cannot be sensitive to it, or that it will not become an allergen. These references, being based on so many patch test results, are a good basis but it is always best to get a patch test yourself.

1. Warshaw, E.M., Maibach, H.I., Taylor, J.S., et al. North American contact dermatitis group patch test results: 2011-2012. Dermatitis. 2015; 26: 49-59

2. W Uter et al. The European Baseline Series in 10 European Countries, 2005/2006–Results of the European Surveillance System on Contact Allergies (ESSCA). Contact Dermatitis 61 (1), 31-38.7 2009

3. Wetter, DA et al. Results of patch testing to personal care product allergens in a standard series and a supplemental cosmetic series: An analysis of 945 patients from the Mayo Clinic Contact Dermatitis Group, 2000-2007. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2010 Nov;63(5):789-98.

4. Verallo-Rowell VM. The validated hypoallergenic cosmetics rating system: its 30-year evolution and effect on the prevalence of cosmetic reactions. Dermatitis 2011 Apr; 22(2):80-97

5. Ruby Pawankar et al. World Health Organization. White Book on Allergy 2011-2012 Executive Summary.

6. Misery L et al. Sensitive skin in the American population: prevalence, clinical data, and role of the dermatologist. Int J Dermatol. 2011 Aug;50(8):961-7.

7. Warshaw EM1, Maibach HI, Taylor JS, Sasseville D, DeKoven JG, Zirwas MJ, Fransway AF, Mathias CG, Zug KA, DeLeo VA, Fowler JF Jr, Marks JG, Pratt MD, Storrs FJ, Belsito DV. North American contact dermatitis group patch test results: 2011-2012.Dermatitis. 2015 Jan-Feb;26(1):49-59.

8. Warshaw, E et al. Allergic patch test reactions associated with cosmetics: Retrospective analysis of cross-sectional data from the North American Contact Dermatitis Group, 2001-2004. J AmAcadDermatol 2009;60:23-38. 

9. Foliaki S et al. Antibiotic use in infancy and symptoms of asthma, rhinoconjunctivitis, and eczema in children 6 and 7 years old: International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood Phase III. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2009 Nov;124(5):982-9.

10. Kei EF et al. Role of the gut microbiota in defining human health. Expert Rev Anti Infect Ther. 2010 Apr; 8(4): 435–454.

11. Thavagnanam S et al. A meta-analysis of the association between Caesarean section and childhood asthma. Clin Exp Allergy. 2008;38(4):629–633.

12. Marks JG, Belsito DV, DeLeo VA, et al. North American Contact Dermatitis Group patch-test results, 1998 to 2000. Am J Contact Dermat. 2003;14(2):59-62.

13. Warshaw EM, Belsito DV, Taylor JS, et al. North American Contact Dermatitis Group patch test results: 2009 to 2010. Dermatitis. 2013;24(2):50-99.

Categories
Allergen, Not An Allergen Featured Skin

NAIL POLISH: Allergen or Not An Allergen?

Allergen.

Nail Polish

Nail polish contains several ingredients that are common allergens, including: shellac, glues, preservatives, and acrylates. If brightly colored, dyes as well. The most common: tosylamide formaldehyde resin; butyl acetate, and the nail varnish. And this is just the polish. Several products involved in nail polish application and removal, including fake nails have their own issues…enough to merit separate posts!

If you have a history of sensitive skin, don’t guess: random trial and error can cause more damage. Ask your dermatologist about a patch test.

For more:

On the prevalence of skin allergies, see Skin Allergies Are More Common Than Ever and One In Four Is Allergic to Common Skin Care And Cosmetic Ingredients.

To learn more about the VH-Rating System and hypoallergenicity, click here.

References: 

Regularly published reports on the most common allergens by the North American Contact Dermatitis Group and European Surveillance System on Contact Allergies (based on over 28,000 patch test results, combined), plus other studies. Remember, we are all individuals — just because an ingredient is not on the most common allergen lists does not mean you cannot be sensitive to it, or that it will not become an allergen. These references, being based on so many patch test results, are a good basis but it is always best to get a patch test yourself.

1. Warshaw, E.M., Maibach, H.I., Taylor, J.S., et al. North American contact dermatitis group patch test results: 2011-2012. Dermatitis. 2015; 26: 49-59

2. W Uter et al. The European Baseline Series in 10 European Countries, 2005/2006–Results of the European Surveillance System on Contact Allergies (ESSCA). Contact Dermatitis 61 (1), 31-38.7 2009

3. Wetter, DA et al. Results of patch testing to personal care product allergens in a standard series and a supplemental cosmetic series: An analysis of 945 patients from the Mayo Clinic Contact Dermatitis Group, 2000-2007. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2010 Nov;63(5):789-98.

4. Verallo-Rowell VM. The validated hypoallergenic cosmetics rating system: its 30-year evolution and effect on the prevalence of cosmetic reactions. Dermatitis 2011 Apr; 22(2):80-97

5. Ruby Pawankar et al. World Health Organization. White Book on Allergy 2011-2012 Executive Summary.

6. Misery L et al. Sensitive skin in the American population: prevalence, clinical data, and role of the dermatologist. Int J Dermatol. 2011 Aug;50(8):961-7.

7. Warshaw EM1, Maibach HI, Taylor JS, Sasseville D, DeKoven JG, Zirwas MJ, Fransway AF, Mathias CG, Zug KA, DeLeo VA, Fowler JF Jr, Marks JG, Pratt MD, Storrs FJ, Belsito DV. North American contact dermatitis group patch test results: 2011-2012.Dermatitis. 2015 Jan-Feb;26(1):49-59.

8. Warshaw, E et al. Allergic patch test reactions associated with cosmetics: Retrospective analysis of cross-sectional data from the North American Contact Dermatitis Group, 2001-2004. J AmAcadDermatol 2009;60:23-38. 

9. Foliaki S et al. Antibiotic use in infancy and symptoms of asthma, rhinoconjunctivitis, and eczema in children 6 and 7 years old: International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood Phase III. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2009 Nov;124(5):982-9.

10. Kei EF et al. Role of the gut microbiota in defining human health. Expert Rev Anti Infect Ther. 2010 Apr; 8(4): 435–454.

11. Thavagnanam S et al. A meta-analysis of the association between Caesarean section and childhood asthma. Clin Exp Allergy. 2008;38(4):629–633.

12. Marks JG, Belsito DV, DeLeo VA, et al. North American Contact Dermatitis Group patch-test results, 1998 to 2000. Am J Contact Dermat. 2003;14(2):59-62.

13. Warshaw EM, Belsito DV, Taylor JS, et al. North American Contact Dermatitis Group patch test results: 2009 to 2010. Dermatitis. 2013;24(2):50-99.

Categories
Allergen, Not An Allergen Featured Skin

PAPER (UNTREATED): Allergen or Not An Allergen?

Not An Allergen.

Untreated Paper

This is a bit of a tricky one. Paper, as itself, is not on published lists of common allergens. But, most of the paper that we use is treated with multiple allergens that can be real issues for those with contact dermatitis who have patch tested positive for them. Printing paper, stationary, toilet and tissue papers, notebook paper…most are at least bleached with chlorine, which is an irritant. Colored specialty papers would have dyes as added allergens. Brown Manila paper envelopes and corrugated shipping boxes might be treated with preservatives, even if they’re not bleached. Paper that’s completely untreated, like homemade paper — the result of bits of paper or pulp soaked in water, then blended into a slurry and dried —  should lower the risk of common reactions. The more untreated the raw material (not using scraps of brightly-dyed paper, for example), the better.

If you have a history of sensitive skin, don’t guess: random trial and error can cause more damage. Ask your dermatologist about a patch test.

To shop our selection of hypoallergenic products, visit vmvhypoallergenics.com. Need help? Ask us in the comments section below, or for more privacy (such as when asking us to customize recommendations for you based on your patch test results) contact us by email, or drop us a private message on Facebook.

For more:

On the prevalence of skin allergies, see Skin Allergies Are More Common Than Ever and One In Four Is Allergic to Common Skin Care And Cosmetic Ingredients.

To learn more about the VH-Rating System and hypoallergenicity, click here.

References: 

Regularly published reports on the most common allergens by the North American Contact Dermatitis Group and European Surveillance System on Contact Allergies (based on over 28,000 patch test results, combined), plus other studies. Remember, we are all individuals — just because an ingredient is not on the most common allergen lists does not mean you cannot be sensitive to it, or that it will not become an allergen. These references, being based on so many patch test results, are a good basis but it is always best to get a patch test yourself.

1. Warshaw EM1, Maibach HI, Taylor JS, Sasseville D, DeKoven JG, Zirwas MJ, Fransway AF, Mathias CG, Zug KA, DeLeo VA, Fowler JF Jr, Marks JG, Pratt MD, Storrs FJ, Belsito DV. North American contact dermatitis group patch test results: 2011-2012. Dermatitis. 2015 Jan-Feb;26(1):49-59

2. W Uter et al. The European Baseline Series in 10 European Countries, 2005/2006–Results of the European Surveillance System on Contact Allergies (ESSCA). Contact Dermatitis 61 (1), 31-38.7 2009

3. Wetter, DA et al. Results of patch testing to personal care product allergens in a standard series and a supplemental cosmetic series: An analysis of 945 patients from the Mayo Clinic Contact Dermatitis Group, 2000-2007. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2010 Nov;63(5):789-98.

4. Verallo-Rowell VM. The validated hypoallergenic cosmetics rating system: its 30-year evolution and effect on the prevalence of cosmetic reactions. Dermatitis 2011 Apr; 22(2):80-97

5. Ruby Pawankar et al. World Health Organization. White Book on Allergy 2011-2012 Executive Summary.

6. Misery L et al. Sensitive skin in the American population: prevalence, clinical data, and role of the dermatologist. Int J Dermatol. 2011 Aug;50(8):961-7.

7. Warshaw EM1, Maibach HI, Taylor JS, Sasseville D, DeKoven JG, Zirwas MJ, Fransway AF, Mathias CG, Zug KA, DeLeo VA, Fowler JF Jr, Marks JG, Pratt MD, Storrs FJ, Belsito DV. North American contact dermatitis group patch test results: 2011-2012.Dermatitis. 2015 Jan-Feb;26(1):49-59.

8. Warshaw, E et al. Allergic patch test reactions associated with cosmetics: Retrospective analysis of cross-sectional data from the North American Contact Dermatitis Group, 2001-2004. J AmAcadDermatol 2009;60:23-38. 

9. Foliaki S et al. Antibiotic use in infancy and symptoms of asthma, rhinoconjunctivitis, and eczema in children 6 and 7 years old: International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood Phase III. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2009 Nov;124(5):982-9.

10. Kei EF et al. Role of the gut microbiota in defining human health. Expert Rev Anti Infect Ther. 2010 Apr; 8(4): 435–454.

11. Thavagnanam S et al. A meta-analysis of the association between Caesarean section and childhood asthma. Clin Exp Allergy. 2008;38(4):629–633.

12. Marks JG, Belsito DV, DeLeo VA, et al. North American Contact Dermatitis Group patch-test results, 1998 to 2000. Am J Contact Dermat. 2003;14(2):59-62.

13. Warshaw EM, Belsito DV, Taylor JS, et al. North American Contact Dermatitis Group patch test results: 2009 to 2010. Dermatitis. 2013;24(2):50-99.

Categories
Allergen, Not An Allergen Featured Skin

AVOCADO: Allergen, or Not An Allergen?

Not An Allergen.

AVOCADO

This fabtastic, delicious superfood is not on published lists of common allergens. However, there are some reports of possible cross reactivity with latex as well as mango (or poison ivy, which have similar skins), tomato, peach, kiwi, tomato, banana, and chestnuts. If you have patch tested positive for latex, practice caution. Avocado is so nutritious and could be a great skin moisturizer — so unless you’ve patch tested positive for it or its cross reactants specifically (or a scratch test revealed it as a food allergy), this is one food to keep in your diet!

If you have a history of sensitive skin, don’t guess: random trial and error can cause more damage. Ask your dermatologist about a patch test.

To shop our selection of hypoallergenic products, visit vmvhypoallergenics.com. Need help? Ask us in the comments section below, or for more privacy (such as when asking us to customize recommendations for you based on your patch test results) contact us by email, or drop us a private message on Facebook.

For more:

On the prevalence of skin allergies, see Skin Allergies Are More Common Than Ever and One In Four Is Allergic to Common Skin Care And Cosmetic Ingredients.

To learn more about the VH-Rating System and hypoallergenicity, click here.

References: 

Regularly published reports on the most common allergens by the North American Contact Dermatitis Group and European Surveillance System on Contact Allergies (based on over 28,000 patch test results, combined), plus other studies. Remember, we are all individuals — just because an ingredient is not on the most common allergen lists does not mean you cannot be sensitive to it, or that it will not become an allergen. These references, being based on so many patch test results, are a good basis but it is always best to get a patch test yourself.

1. Warshaw EM1, Maibach HI, Taylor JS, Sasseville D, DeKoven JG, Zirwas MJ, Fransway AF, Mathias CG, Zug KA, DeLeo VA, Fowler JF Jr, Marks JG, Pratt MD, Storrs FJ, Belsito DV. North American contact dermatitis group patch test results: 2011-2012. Dermatitis. 2015 Jan-Feb;26(1):49-59

2. W Uter et al. The European Baseline Series in 10 European Countries, 2005/2006–Results of the European Surveillance System on Contact Allergies (ESSCA). Contact Dermatitis 61 (1), 31-38.7 2009

3. Wetter, DA et al. Results of patch testing to personal care product allergens in a standard series and a supplemental cosmetic series: An analysis of 945 patients from the Mayo Clinic Contact Dermatitis Group, 2000-2007. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2010 Nov;63(5):789-98.

4. Verallo-Rowell VM. The validated hypoallergenic cosmetics rating system: its 30-year evolution and effect on the prevalence of cosmetic reactions. Dermatitis 2011 Apr; 22(2):80-97

5. Ruby Pawankar et al. World Health Organization. White Book on Allergy 2011-2012 Executive Summary.

6. Misery L et al. Sensitive skin in the American population: prevalence, clinical data, and role of the dermatologist. Int J Dermatol. 2011 Aug;50(8):961-7.

7. Warshaw EM1, Maibach HI, Taylor JS, Sasseville D, DeKoven JG, Zirwas MJ, Fransway AF, Mathias CG, Zug KA, DeLeo VA, Fowler JF Jr, Marks JG, Pratt MD, Storrs FJ, Belsito DV. North American contact dermatitis group patch test results: 2011-2012.Dermatitis. 2015 Jan-Feb;26(1):49-59.

8. Warshaw, E et al. Allergic patch test reactions associated with cosmetics: Retrospective analysis of cross-sectional data from the North American Contact Dermatitis Group, 2001-2004. J AmAcadDermatol 2009;60:23-38. 

9. Foliaki S et al. Antibiotic use in infancy and symptoms of asthma, rhinoconjunctivitis, and eczema in children 6 and 7 years old: International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood Phase III. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2009 Nov;124(5):982-9.

10. Kei EF et al. Role of the gut microbiota in defining human health. Expert Rev Anti Infect Ther. 2010 Apr; 8(4): 435–454.

11. Thavagnanam S et al. A meta-analysis of the association between Caesarean section and childhood asthma. Clin Exp Allergy. 2008;38(4):629–633.

12. Marks JG, Belsito DV, DeLeo VA, et al. North American Contact Dermatitis Group patch-test results, 1998 to 2000. Am J Contact Dermat. 2003;14(2):59-62.

13. Warshaw EM, Belsito DV, Taylor JS, et al. North American Contact Dermatitis Group patch test results: 2009 to 2010. Dermatitis. 2013;24(2):50-99.

Categories
Allergen, Not An Allergen Featured Skin

VIRGIN OLIVE OIL: Allergen or Not An Allergen?

Not An Allergen.

Virgin Olive Oil

Virgin olive oil — with minimum processing and no additives — is not a common allergen and can be a good emollient or moisturizer. Recent studies, however, are showing that it is a penetration enhancer, helping ingredients go deeper into the skin. While that might sound like a good thing, the risk of allergies actually increases with better penetration. This is why a golden rule of hypoallergenic formulations is to use ingredients with larger molecules that are less likely to penetrate the skin. So if you’re going to be adding olive oil to your regimen, make sure you don’t use other products with allergens or comedogens. And if you’re going to be using products with olive oil as an ingredient, take a close look at the other ingredients. The presence of olive oil may make any allergens, irritants, or comedogens even more of a problem.

If you have a history of sensitive skin, don’t guess: random trial and error can cause more damage. Ask your dermatologist about a patch test.

To shop our selection of hypoallergenic products, visit vmvhypoallergenics.com. Need help? Ask us in the comments section below, or for more privacy (such as when asking us to customize recommendations for you based on your patch test results) contact us by email, or drop us a private message on Facebook.

For more:

On the prevalence of skin allergies, see Skin Allergies Are More Common Than Ever and One In Four Is Allergic to Common Skin Care And Cosmetic Ingredients.

To learn more about the VH-Rating System and hypoallergenicity, click here.

References: 

Regularly published reports on the most common allergens by the North American Contact Dermatitis Group and European Surveillance System on Contact Allergies (based on over 28,000 patch test results, combined), plus other studies. Remember, we are all individuals — just because an ingredient is not on the most common allergen lists does not mean you cannot be sensitive to it, or that it will not become an allergen. These references, being based on so many patch test results, are a good basis but it is always best to get a patch test yourself.

1. Warshaw EM1, Maibach HI, Taylor JS, Sasseville D, DeKoven JG, Zirwas MJ, Fransway AF, Mathias CG, Zug KA, DeLeo VA, Fowler JF Jr, Marks JG, Pratt MD, Storrs FJ, Belsito DV. North American contact dermatitis group patch test results: 2011-2012. Dermatitis. 2015 Jan-Feb;26(1):49-59

2. W Uter et al. The European Baseline Series in 10 European Countries, 2005/2006–Results of the European Surveillance System on Contact Allergies (ESSCA). Contact Dermatitis 61 (1), 31-38.7 2009

3. Wetter, DA et al. Results of patch testing to personal care product allergens in a standard series and a supplemental cosmetic series: An analysis of 945 patients from the Mayo Clinic Contact Dermatitis Group, 2000-2007. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2010 Nov;63(5):789-98.

4. Verallo-Rowell VM. The validated hypoallergenic cosmetics rating system: its 30-year evolution and effect on the prevalence of cosmetic reactions. Dermatitis 2011 Apr; 22(2):80-97

5. Ruby Pawankar et al. World Health Organization. White Book on Allergy 2011-2012 Executive Summary.

6. Misery L et al. Sensitive skin in the American population: prevalence, clinical data, and role of the dermatologist. Int J Dermatol. 2011 Aug;50(8):961-7.

7. Warshaw EM1, Maibach HI, Taylor JS, Sasseville D, DeKoven JG, Zirwas MJ, Fransway AF, Mathias CG, Zug KA, DeLeo VA, Fowler JF Jr, Marks JG, Pratt MD, Storrs FJ, Belsito DV. North American contact dermatitis group patch test results: 2011-2012.Dermatitis. 2015 Jan-Feb;26(1):49-59.

8. Warshaw, E et al. Allergic patch test reactions associated with cosmetics: Retrospective analysis of cross-sectional data from the North American Contact Dermatitis Group, 2001-2004. J AmAcadDermatol 2009;60:23-38. 

9. Foliaki S et al. Antibiotic use in infancy and symptoms of asthma, rhinoconjunctivitis, and eczema in children 6 and 7 years old: International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood Phase III. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2009 Nov;124(5):982-9.

10. Kei EF et al. Role of the gut microbiota in defining human health. Expert Rev Anti Infect Ther. 2010 Apr; 8(4): 435–454.

11. Thavagnanam S et al. A meta-analysis of the association between Caesarean section and childhood asthma. Clin Exp Allergy. 2008;38(4):629–633.

12. Marks JG, Belsito DV, DeLeo VA, et al. North American Contact Dermatitis Group patch-test results, 1998 to 2000. Am J Contact Dermat. 2003;14(2):59-62.

13. Warshaw EM, Belsito DV, Taylor JS, et al. North American Contact Dermatitis Group patch test results: 2009 to 2010. Dermatitis. 2013;24(2):50-99.

Categories
Allergen, Not An Allergen Featured Skin

GRASS: Allergen or Not An Allergen?

Allergen.

Grass

Grass might not appear as “grass” in patch test trays, but it is a common cause of contact irritations and allergies, often because of common insecticide ingredients used to keep it green and lush in some gardens, parks, and on golf courses. Even if completely wild and organic, pollens that fall on grass from surrounding plants and flowers can cause problems when coming into contact with it.

If you have a history of sensitive skin, don’t guess: random trial and error can cause more damage. Ask your dermatologist about a patch test.

To shop our selection of hypoallergenic products, visit vmvhypoallergenics.com. Need help? Ask us in the comments section below, or for more privacy (such as when asking us to customize recommendations for you based on your patch test results) contact us by email, or drop us a private message on Facebook.

For more:

On the prevalence of skin allergies, see Skin Allergies Are More Common Than Ever and One In Four Is Allergic to Common Skin Care And Cosmetic Ingredients.

To learn more about the VH-Rating System and hypoallergenicity, click here.

References: 

Regularly published reports on the most common allergens by the North American Contact Dermatitis Group and European Surveillance System on Contact Allergies (based on over 28,000 patch test results, combined), plus other studies. Remember, we are all individuals — just because an ingredient is not on the most common allergen lists does not mean you cannot be sensitive to it, or that it will not become an allergen. These references, being based on so many patch test results, are a good basis but it is always best to get a patch test yourself.

1. Warshaw EM1, Maibach HI, Taylor JS, Sasseville D, DeKoven JG, Zirwas MJ, Fransway AF, Mathias CG, Zug KA, DeLeo VA, Fowler JF Jr, Marks JG, Pratt MD, Storrs FJ, Belsito DV. North American contact dermatitis group patch test results: 2011-2012. Dermatitis. 2015 Jan-Feb;26(1):49-59

2. W Uter et al. The European Baseline Series in 10 European Countries, 2005/2006–Results of the European Surveillance System on Contact Allergies (ESSCA). Contact Dermatitis 61 (1), 31-38.7 2009

3. Wetter, DA et al. Results of patch testing to personal care product allergens in a standard series and a supplemental cosmetic series: An analysis of 945 patients from the Mayo Clinic Contact Dermatitis Group, 2000-2007. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2010 Nov;63(5):789-98.

4. Verallo-Rowell VM. The validated hypoallergenic cosmetics rating system: its 30-year evolution and effect on the prevalence of cosmetic reactions. Dermatitis 2011 Apr; 22(2):80-97

5. Ruby Pawankar et al. World Health Organization. White Book on Allergy 2011-2012 Executive Summary.

6. Misery L et al. Sensitive skin in the American population: prevalence, clinical data, and role of the dermatologist. Int J Dermatol. 2011 Aug;50(8):961-7.

7. Warshaw EM1, Maibach HI, Taylor JS, Sasseville D, DeKoven JG, Zirwas MJ, Fransway AF, Mathias CG, Zug KA, DeLeo VA, Fowler JF Jr, Marks JG, Pratt MD, Storrs FJ, Belsito DV. North American contact dermatitis group patch test results: 2011-2012.Dermatitis. 2015 Jan-Feb;26(1):49-59.

8. Warshaw, E et al. Allergic patch test reactions associated with cosmetics: Retrospective analysis of cross-sectional data from the North American Contact Dermatitis Group, 2001-2004. J AmAcadDermatol 2009;60:23-38. 

9. Foliaki S et al. Antibiotic use in infancy and symptoms of asthma, rhinoconjunctivitis, and eczema in children 6 and 7 years old: International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood Phase III. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2009 Nov;124(5):982-9.

10. Kei EF et al. Role of the gut microbiota in defining human health. Expert Rev Anti Infect Ther. 2010 Apr; 8(4): 435–454.

11. Thavagnanam S et al. A meta-analysis of the association between Caesarean section and childhood asthma. Clin Exp Allergy. 2008;38(4):629–633.

12. Marks JG, Belsito DV, DeLeo VA, et al. North American Contact Dermatitis Group patch-test results, 1998 to 2000. Am J Contact Dermat. 2003;14(2):59-62.

13. Warshaw EM, Belsito DV, Taylor JS, et al. North American Contact Dermatitis Group patch test results: 2009 to 2010. Dermatitis. 2013;24(2):50-99.

Categories
Allergen, Not An Allergen Featured Skin

YOGURT: Allergen or Not An Allergen?

Not An Allergen.

Yogurt

Natural, unflavored yogurt — without fruit, sweeteners, flavors, or other additives — is not on published lists of common allergens. It is a protein, however, so if you have a history of allergies to food, ask an allergist for a scratch test. But applied on skin? Yogurt is not currently a known allergen. Taken internally, it could impact your skin’s health by improving your microbiota. And while more studies need to be done, theoretically, its probiotics could provide benefits to skin when used externally, too. If you decide to experiment with yogurt applied on the skin, make sure to use pure, natural yogurt without flavors, sweeteners, fruit, preservatives, or other additives, many of which are known skin allergens.

If you have a history of sensitive skin, don’t guess: random trial and error can cause more damage. Ask your dermatologist about a patch test.

To shop our selection of hypoallergenic products, visit vmvhypoallergenics.com. Need help? Ask us in the comments section below, or for more privacy (such as when asking us to customize recommendations for you based on your patch test results) contact us by email, or drop us a private message on Facebook.

For more:

On the prevalence of skin allergies, see Skin Allergies Are More Common Than Ever and One In Four Is Allergic to Common Skin Care And Cosmetic Ingredients.

To learn more about the VH-Rating System and hypoallergenicity, click here.

References: 

Regularly published reports on the most common allergens by the North American Contact Dermatitis Group and European Surveillance System on Contact Allergies (based on over 28,000 patch test results, combined), plus other studies. Remember, we are all individuals — just because an ingredient is not on the most common allergen lists does not mean you cannot be sensitive to it, or that it will not become an allergen. These references, being based on so many patch test results, are a good basis but it is always best to get a patch test yourself.

1. Warshaw EM1, Maibach HI, Taylor JS, Sasseville D, DeKoven JG, Zirwas MJ, Fransway AF, Mathias CG, Zug KA, DeLeo VA, Fowler JF Jr, Marks JG, Pratt MD, Storrs FJ, Belsito DV. North American contact dermatitis group patch test results: 2011-2012. Dermatitis. 2015 Jan-Feb;26(1):49-59

2. W Uter et al. The European Baseline Series in 10 European Countries, 2005/2006–Results of the European Surveillance System on Contact Allergies (ESSCA). Contact Dermatitis 61 (1), 31-38.7 2009

3. Wetter, DA et al. Results of patch testing to personal care product allergens in a standard series and a supplemental cosmetic series: An analysis of 945 patients from the Mayo Clinic Contact Dermatitis Group, 2000-2007. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2010 Nov;63(5):789-98.

4. Verallo-Rowell VM. The validated hypoallergenic cosmetics rating system: its 30-year evolution and effect on the prevalence of cosmetic reactions. Dermatitis 2011 Apr; 22(2):80-97

5. Ruby Pawankar et al. World Health Organization. White Book on Allergy 2011-2012 Executive Summary.

6. Misery L et al. Sensitive skin in the American population: prevalence, clinical data, and role of the dermatologist. Int J Dermatol. 2011 Aug;50(8):961-7.

7. Warshaw EM1, Maibach HI, Taylor JS, Sasseville D, DeKoven JG, Zirwas MJ, Fransway AF, Mathias CG, Zug KA, DeLeo VA, Fowler JF Jr, Marks JG, Pratt MD, Storrs FJ, Belsito DV. North American contact dermatitis group patch test results: 2011-2012.Dermatitis. 2015 Jan-Feb;26(1):49-59.

8. Warshaw, E et al. Allergic patch test reactions associated with cosmetics: Retrospective analysis of cross-sectional data from the North American Contact Dermatitis Group, 2001-2004. J AmAcadDermatol 2009;60:23-38. 

9. Foliaki S et al. Antibiotic use in infancy and symptoms of asthma, rhinoconjunctivitis, and eczema in children 6 and 7 years old: International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood Phase III. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2009 Nov;124(5):982-9.

10. Kei EF et al. Role of the gut microbiota in defining human health. Expert Rev Anti Infect Ther. 2010 Apr; 8(4): 435–454.

11. Thavagnanam S et al. A meta-analysis of the association between Caesarean section and childhood asthma. Clin Exp Allergy. 2008;38(4):629–633.

12. Marks JG, Belsito DV, DeLeo VA, et al. North American Contact Dermatitis Group patch-test results, 1998 to 2000. Am J Contact Dermat. 2003;14(2):59-62.

13. Warshaw EM, Belsito DV, Taylor JS, et al. North American Contact Dermatitis Group patch test results: 2009 to 2010. Dermatitis. 2013;24(2):50-99.